17 Best Gourami Tank Mates

The gourami family is one of the most popular fish families because they have beautiful colours, textures and are very easy to look after. It’s important to know that some gourami species will attack other fish constantly, while others will only do so during breeding seasons. 

Gouramis are a species of freshwater fish that provide a lot of joy for both beginner and experienced aquarists. However, they also require some specific tank mates to thrive in captivity. In addition, some types of gourami fish can occasionally get aggressive and will even attack other fish.

Here, we will discuss some good tank mates for gourami, emphasizing compatibility and space requirements.

Fancy Guppy: (Poecilia Reticulata)

Male Guppies | Source: Deposit Photos

The Fancy Guppy is a colourful, peaceful fish that will either match or contrast the colors of your Gouramis; thus, you can choose your favourite. Having more than one fish is recommended, but they are timid and outcompeted for food by fast-eating fish such as gouramis.

The fantail makes them stand out. These fish come in various colours, from blue with red eyes to black or white with orange spots. The guppy grows up to 2 inches in length and should be kept in a school of at least five. 

Compatibility

These fish are exceptionally compatible with gouramis because they enjoy water temperature, pH, and food. A single male guppy can be kept with several female gouramis, as long as the tank is large enough to accommodate all of them.  

Space Requirements

They should be kept in at least five schools but can live happily in groups larger than 10. Additionally, these fish are among the smallest in the world and require less than a gallon of water each. 

Harlequin Rasbora: (Trigonostigma Heteromorpha)

Harlequin Rasboras | Source: Deposit Photos

This peaceful fish is often underappreciated due to its small size. These small, pearl-coloured fish are beautiful and easy to care for (when kept in a healthy environment). They are often used as dither fish for larger species of tankmates, but they can also make great companions for gouramis.

Compatibility

The Harlequin rosbora fish is compatible with gouramis.. One male and several females can be kept in a somewhat small tank together, but they will need plenty of covers to provide security from other tankmates.

Space Requirements

A single fish will need at least a 10-gallon tank, but more is necessary as they grow and share a tank with gouramis.

Rosy Red Minnows: (Rosy Reds, Cherry Nosed Tetra)

These tiny fish are often overlooked, but they can be a great addition to a community tank with gouramis. Like the Harlequin rosbora, they eat leftover food and algae. They can be a bit aggressive toward others of their kind but tend to behave themselves with other small fish.

Compatibility

These tiny fish are very compatible with gouramis. Although they are relatively small, a single male can be kept with several females in the same tank. They may look a bit too small for larger species of gouramis, especially if multiple rosy reds are kept in a tank.

Space Requirements

A minimum of 10 gallons for a single fish, but they should never be kept alone or with larger tank mates. One rosy red minnow can be kept in a 10-gallon tank, but they will need more rings if other fish share the space.

Clown Loach: (Botia Macracantha)

Clown Loach w/ Albino Rainbow Shark in Background | Source: Deposit Photos

This popular and unusual-looking fish is often considered a bottom-dwelling species that will ignore all other tankmates. However, it has also been known to nip at fins and damage some gouramis.  The clown loach has a striking yellow and black pattern and can grow up to 12 inches in length, so it requires a large tank to accommodate its needs. 

Compatibility

You can add different species of clown loach to the tank because they are compatible with gouramis. Although these fish are tiny, you can keep female clown loaches with one or more males in a tank at least 20 gallons in size.

Space Requirements

A single fish will need at least 20 gallons of space but are rarely kept alone in captivity.

Kuhli Loach: (Coolie Loach) 

Kuhli Loach | Photo 174806634 © Joan Carles Juarez | Dreamstime.com

Also known as flag Loach, striped dwarf loach, and Kuhli loaches are small species that are very peaceful and active at the bottom of their environment. They are often kept with other species that enjoy a similar habitat, making them excellent tankmates for gouramis.

Compatibility

A single kuhli loach male can be kept with several females. A group of 6 or more kuhli loaches will be peaceful and compatible, but they will often show mild aggression towards other bottom-dwellers. 

Space Requirements

A 3-4 fish group will need at least a 30-gallon tank with plenty of plants and hiding places.

White Cloud Mountain Minnows: (Tanichthys Albonubes)

White Cloud Mountain Minnow | Source: Deposit Photos

Despite their small size, they are compatible with most fish and are not susceptible to diseases.

White clouds are very peaceful fish and are somewhat active, making them good tankmates for gourami, as long as another fish isn’t picking on them, and they have plenty of hiding places.

Compatibility

The white cloud mountain minnow and gourami make an ideal pair. You can keep a single minnow with several female gouramis, but they are best when added to the tank as a group of juveniles.

Space Requirements

A 15-gallon tank for several minnows is the absolute minimum, but they do best when they have plenty of room.

Celestial Pearl Danios: (Celestichthys Margaritas)

Celestial Pearl Danio | Source: Deposit Photos

While they are small, they can be aggressive towards smaller fish with long fins, so make sure you have them in a larger tank. They need at least three of their kind in the tank, so if you want to put them with other fish. These fish are not picky about water quality, and they eat most commercial foods without any trouble.

Compatibility

As far as compatibility with gouramis is concerned, celestial pearl danios do well. It is common for the Celestial pearl danios to group with small schooling fish like the Harlequin Rasbora. Danios are also sometimes used in community tanks that feature larger and more aggressive fish.

Space Requirements

A 15-gallon tank is a minimum size, but danios need an even bigger space to thrive.

Zebra Danio: (Brachydanio Rerio)

Zebra Danio | Source: Deposit Photos

These are very peaceful fish but may nip at plants. They are active swimmers and need plenty of space, so a larger tank is best. 

They need a tight lid, as they are jumpers. The zebra danios are very similar to the cherry barbs – both are easy to care for, active, and look nice. However, they are not so good at swimming – they prefer to stay in one place all day. 

Compatibility

A single danio can be kept with several female gouramis, but they need to be added as a group to a tank that is at least 20 gallons in size.

Space Requirements

A 10-gallon tank will work when kept with just females, but they are best when kept in groups of 3. A group of 5 or more danio are best when kept in slightly larger.

Bettas: (Siamese Fighting Fish)

My Betta in Front of My Ottos | Source: Tiny Underwater | License: CC-BY-4.0

Male bettas can be a little territorial, especially if one is larger than the other. You can also introduce bettas to a well-planted tank and use large leaves to give your betta places to hide. Male bettas are aggressive, so you must have a tank with a secure lid that is very tight-fitting.

Compatibility

Despite their compatibility, male bettas can be aggressive towards one another, so it’s best to keep them alone or in large tanks with several other gourami species. You can keep multiple female bettas in large enough tanks, but it is not recommended unless you know what you’re doing. They can work with other species, though.

Space Requirements

It should have a tight-fitting lid and be densely planted with large leaves. A single betta needs at least a 20-gallon tank, but they are best in groups. You can keep a single betta with several female gouramis.  

Cherry Barb (Puntius Titteya)

Cherry Barb | Source: Deposit Photos

Like the Tiger Barb, these fish are both easy to care for and peaceful. They have pink/red fins with a black body. However, they are also very active, so they are not good tankmates for fish that just lay around all day.

Compatibility

You can keep a single barb with several female gouramis, but they need to be added as a group to a tank that is at least 10 gallons in size.

Space Requirements

A single barb needs at least a 10-gallon tank, but they are best in groups.

Whiptail Catfish (Aspidontus Taeniatus)

Whiptail Catfish | Photo 181071657 © Valeronio | Dreamstime.com

Whiptail catfish are very peaceful fish and do well with almost any tank mates. They are nocturnal feeders, so they primarily eat invertebrates that fall into the aquarium during the night. They also like to hide under leaves and plants, so make sure there is plenty of covers.

Compatibility

Whiptails are very compatible with gouramis. It’s advisable to place one whiptail with gouramis in a tank. A single whiptail can be kept with several female gouramis, but they should be added as a group to a tank that is at least 20 gallons in size.

Space Requirements

A single whiptail needs at least a 20-gallon tank, but they do best when kept in groups of 4 or more. Therefore, a group of at least six is recommended, with a minimum tank size of 20 gallons.

Tiger Barbs(Puntius Tetrazona)

Tiger Barbs | (C) Tiny Underwater | License: CC-BY-4.0

These fish are active swimmers, but they are not very aggressive. They do much better when kept with peaceful fish rather than with other active tankmates. They are also beautiful – the male has a red belly and orange fins, while the female is silver with black accents.

Compatibility

It is possible to keep more than one gourami with a tiger betta, but they must be in a large tank to hold the fish in groups of at least ten gallons because they are very active. Barbs are very active fish, so you should only keep them with gouramis if you have a large tank 

Space Requirements

A single barb needs at least a 10-gallon tank, but they are best in groups.

Giant Danio (Devario Aequipinnatus)

Malabar Danio AKA Giant Danio | Source: Deposit Photos

These fish are huge and active, which makes them a perfect tankmate for the gourami. They also need a larger tank with plenty of hiding places, which makes them perfect for your gouramis.

Compatibility

You can keep giant danios with several female gouramis.  

Space Requirements

 These fish require a larger tank than most gouramis but provide a peaceful and active addition to any tank.

A single danio needs at least a 20-gallon tank, but they are best in groups.  However, they prefer plants with plenty of hiding places. Giant danios will grow between 4 and 5 inches in the wild, but only 2 inches in captivity.

Panda Corydoras (Corydoras Panda)

Corydoras | Source: Deposit Photos

Like the giant danio, they do well in a slightly larger tank with plenty of hiding places along with some open space to swim. They are peaceful fish and won’t bother your gouramis which makes them a perfect tankmate.  

Compatibility

Panda corydoras can be kept with several female gouramis because they are very compatible. 

Space Requirements

A single panda needs at least a 20-gallon tank, but they are best in groups.

Glowlight Tetra (Hemigrammus Erythrozonus)

Glowlight Tetra | Source: Deposit Photos

These fish species are small but very hardy and active. They do well with other peaceful fish as long as they have a larger tank with plenty of hiding places. They also need soft water with a pH between 6 and 7.

Compatibility

You can keep one glowlight with several female gouramis, but the tank needs to be large enough for them to swim together as a group.

Space Requirements

A single glowlight needs at least a 20-gallon tank, but they are best in groups.

Pygmy Corydoras (Corydoras Pygmaeus) 

Corydoras Habrosus | Photo 159015304 © jessica keras | Dreamstime.com

Also known as Hastatus or Habrosus these tiny pygmy cory are very small and peaceful, so they will not bother even the smallest tankmates. They are not very active but are always ready to run for cover when necessary. They are very beneficial since they eat leftover food and algae from the bottom of the tank.

Compatibility

Pygmy corydoras are compatible with gouramis because they’re timid and easily frightened, so be sure to use a very secure lid on the tank. You can keep a group of three with several female gouramis.  

Space Requirements

A school of pygmy corydoras will need a 10-gallon tank with a tight-fitting lid. These small fish are great companions for the gourami. They like the same water conditions and eat the same kinds of foods as the gouramis. 

Bristlenose Pleco (Ancistrus sp.)

Bristlenose Pleco AKA Bushynose Pleco | Photo 223316097 © Valeronio | Dreamstime.com

This catfish is easy to care for and will eat most types of algae. They also adjust well to tank life, and you can keep it with other fish. The bristlenose pleco is peaceful and can be kept with other fish, like gouramis. This fish may be one of the most popular plecos, due to its relatively small size and peaceful nature. The bristles around their mouth are used for both eating and protecting themselves.

Compatibility

This pleco is compatible with gouramis. It can be kept in a community tank with other species of gouramis, as long as there is a decent amount of space for the pleco to find some solitude when desired. You can keep a bristlenose with many types of gouramis.

Space Requirements

One pleco can be housed in a 20-gallon tank, but keep in mind that they will need more than the bare minimum of space. These fish are usually sold in smaller tanks, so an upgrade is necessary when keeping them with gouramis.

Conclusion

These fish will make great tank mates for your Gourami and live in the same size tanks. The only downside is that they need to be fed at different times, so you may want to get a few feeders too. 

Make sure your tank is big enough for more than one of the same species of fish – this means you need at least a 30-gallon tank if you want to keep two of the same type of fish. If you have a small tank, it is recommended that you only put one type of gourami in your tank.